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Shipping this Christmas

In this exceptional year where many families won’t be able to get together, gift wrapping takes on a special importance. I have brainstormed a lot to figure out a packaging that would be both easy on the environment yet elegant. All the materials are based on recycled paper, and personalised as needed by printing the logo with compostable inks. I also include a card, just pop me an email with the text and I will be happy to hand write it for you! https://youtu.be/70120SjQFow

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Arimatsu Shibori, from tradition to innovation

Was very lucky to attend a workshop with Kuno Hiroaki organised by Couleur Garance. His enthusiasm about traditional indigo shibori and the way he envisions it’s transposition into a XXIe century sustainable and modern production is very inspiring. We trained in Te-Kumo shibori, and realised the unbelievable amount of work needed to create the patterns by this tying method onto a large (or long) piece of fabric… Kuno brought with him some very ancient textiles, some of them created with forgotten shibori techniques that made then real treasures! Endless inspiration…

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Buaisou: advanced indigo dying and reserve techniques course

Mei Line @ Buaisu, Part 1: advanced indigo dying and reserve techniques course

A 10 day training organised by @leafluberon in Tokushima, Japan, at the @Buaisou-i workshop. An eagerly anticipated trip which went way ahead of my expectations. Filled with people passionate about indigo, natural dying practices, sustainability, life and slow fashion; it was an experience I will treasure for the years to come! You can also find out more about this experience on the Mei Line instagram account @Mei.Line.Design @Buaisou-i is an indigo dyeing workshop and slow fashion creator but also an indigo farmer: the concept is «From farm to closet». On top of the indigo dying and reserve techniques, we learned about the traditional Japanese indigo vat making named Aidate. We also visited several local workshops all rooted in local traditions but with a very modern edge that seriously…

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Sur la route du Tokaido @ Musée Guimet

It seems as I haven’ really come back from Japan… keep looking for indigo everywhere! On a busy day in paris, I managed to stop at the Musee Guimet to catch an exhibition showcasing a flurry of etchings from the famed Tokaido route. The Tokaido is the east and most famous of the Gokaido routes. It started to develop from the Kamakura (1185-1333) period, but reached a peak during the Edo (1603-1868) period. We have heard about it many times during our Japanese workshops as it widely participated to the flourishing indigo economy on that part of the island. Indigo is indeed very present in the etchings, in the landscapes but also on the clothes which are a fascinating sight if you have the slightest interest in indigo reserve techniques! The…

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Sur la route du Tokaido @ Musée Guimet

Sur la route du Tokaido, Musee Guimet

It seems as I haven’ really come back from Japan… keep looking for indigo everywhere! On a busy day in paris, I managed to stop at the Musee Guimet to catch an exhibition showcasing a flurry of etchings from the famed Tokaido route. The Tokaido is the east and most famous of the Gokaido routes. It started to develop from the Kamakura (1185-1333) period, but reached a peak during the Edo (1603-1868) period. We have heard about it many times during our Japanese workshops as it widely participated to the flourishing indigo economy on that part of the island. Indigo is indeed very present in the etchings, in the landscapes but also on the clothes which are a fascinating sight if you have the slightest interest in indigo reserve techniques! The…

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Nuishibori

Mei Line nuishibori

Nuishibori es un nombre utilizado en Japón para todas las técnicas de reserva donde se trata de pegar y ala. Es un mundo fascinante que estoy empezando a explorar, y me parece que aplicarlo a nuestras telas típicamente francesas creó un maravilloso crisol cultural. Pegando y atando la tela. dependiendo del patrón de los puntos son más o menos lejos appart, pero siempre implica una cantidad considerable de puntos y nudos por metro cuadrado de tela. índigo teñindo los paquetes atado Algunas telas acabadas… ¡Felicidad!

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Teñido de índigo

En el mundo de los tintes naturales, el índigo tiene un lugar propio. A diferencia de otros tintes, no necesita mordante y se puede aplicar a la tela inmediatamente después de escudriñar. Sin embargo, sigue siendo muy laborioso, y la paciencia sigue siendo esencial aquí. El tinte se aplica por capas, sumergiendo la tela de forma repetitiva, y oxigenándolo entre las inmersiones para permitir que el azul índigo aparezca e intensifique con cada inmersión posterior. Una de las muchas cosas que aprendimos durante nuestro curso avanzado de 10 días en Buaisou, en Japón, es enjuagar y fijar el índigo. Puede sonar como una cosa simple, pero la manipulación cuidadosa de la tela durante esos pasos es primordial para el efecto final. El enjuage se hace durante 3 dias…

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Itajime shibori

Itajime shibori en Mei Line

Itajime shibori es otra técnica de reserva utilizada para crear patrones. Esta vez la tela se dobla y se prensa entre dos piezas de madera. Los pliegues, junto con la colocación de la prensa, conducen a una variedad de patrones. Siempre estoy asombrada con la magia de esas creaciones geométricas al desplegar la tela, es el mejor momento!! La tela está cuidadosamente doblada y presionada entre dos prensas de madera Para obtener la profundidad de color requerida es necesario realizar una serie de inmersiones en la cuba de índigo. Entre cada inmersión, la tela se oxigena pacientemente abriendo cada pliegue. Luego se enjuaga y el proceso se repite Después de desdoblar… ¡Felicidad! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wQ-J9QKuRCI

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Arashi shibori

Arashi shibori at Mei Line

The Arashi pattern is created by tying a piece of cloth very tightly around a cylinder and then crumpling down the fabric to form little creases. It is one of the numerous reserve techniques used in Japan grouped under the shibori term. The tradition was to use a very large bamboo section in Japan, but here, we make do with PVC tube. The fabric is dyed in the indigo vat, several bath separated by oxygenation and rinsing are necessary to achieve the desired tint. After the 3 days long process of rinsing and scouring, the fabric is put to dry. The word Arashi means lightning, but to me the pattern evokes water, with an infinity of ideas for it’s future use around the house and body..

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