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Shipping this Christmas

In this exceptional year where many families won’t be able to get together, gift wrapping takes on a special importance. I have brainstormed a lot to figure out a packaging that would be both easy on the environment yet elegant. All the materials are based on recycled paper, and personalised as needed by printing the logo with compostable inks. I also include a card, just pop me an email with the text and I will be happy to hand write it for you! https://youtu.be/70120SjQFow

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Nuishibori

Mei Line nuishibori

Nuishibori is a name used in Japan for all reserve techniques where stitching and tying is involved. It is a fascinating world I am starting to explore, and I find that applying it to our typically French fabrics created a wonderful cultural melting pot. Stitching and tying the fabric. depending on the pattern the stitches are more or less far appart, but it always involves a considerable amount of stitches and knots per square meter of fabric. Indigo dyeing the tied bundles Some finished fabrics… bliss!

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Indigo dyeing

In the world of natural dyes, indigo has a place on it’s own. Unlike other dyes, it does not need mordanting and can be applied to the fabric straight after scouring. However, it is still very labour intensive, and patience is still of essence here. The dye is applied by layers, dipping the fabric repetitively, and oxygenating it between the dips to allow the indigo blue to appear and intensify with every subsequent dip. One of the many things that we learned during our 10 day advanced course at Buaisou, in Japan, is to rinse and fix the indigo. It might sound like a simple thing, but careful manipulation of the fabric during those steps is paramount to the final effect. The rinsing process involved several cold and…

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Itajime shibori

Itajime shibori at Mei Line

Itajime shibori is another reserve technique used to create patterns. This time the fabric is folded and pressed between two pieces of wood. The folds, along with press placement, lead to a variety of patterns. I am always in awe with the magic of those geometric creations when unfolding the fabric, it’s the best time!! The fabric is carefully folded and clamped between two wood presses A number of dips in the indigo vat are necessary to obtain the required depth of colour. Between each dip, the fabric is patiently oxygenated by opening up each fold. It is then rinsed and the process is repeated After unfolding… Bliss!

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Arashi shibori

Arashi shibori at Mei Line

The Arashi pattern is created by tying a piece of cloth very tightly around a cylinder and then crumpling down the fabric to form little creases. It is one of the numerous reserve techniques used in Japan grouped under the shibori term. The tradition was to use a very large bamboo section in Japan, but here, we make do with PVC tube. The fabric is dyed in the indigo vat, several bath separated by oxygenation and rinsing are necessary to achieve the desired tint. After the 3 days long process of rinsing and scouring, the fabric is put to dry. The word Arashi means lightning, but to me the pattern evokes water, with an infinity of ideas for it’s future use around the house and body..

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Easter @ la Baye des Anges

A very peculiar Easter this year, in surreal isolation, but plenty of photo opportunities for Mei Line’s catalog with a glorious weather.. This year, we vowed a zero waste easter: we will eat every single egg the bunny will bring us.. Table cloth and cushion: block printed campeche dyed linen. The indigo shibori-covered basket is the perfect recipient for a lovely egg-crop Happy Easter y’all! Keep safe!

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Sur la route du Tokaido @ Musée Guimet

It seems as I haven’ really come back from Japan… keep looking for indigo everywhere! On a busy day in paris, I managed to stop at the Musee Guimet to catch an exhibition showcasing a flurry of etchings from the famed Tokaido route. The Tokaido is the east and most famous of the Gokaido routes. It started to develop from the Kamakura (1185-1333) period, but reached a peak during the Edo (1603-1868) period. We have heard about it many times during our Japanese workshops as it widely participated to the flourishing indigo economy on that part of the island. Indigo is indeed very present in the etchings, in the landscapes but also on the clothes which are a fascinating sight if you have the slightest interest in indigo reserve techniques! The…

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Buaisou: advanced indigo dying and reserve techniques course

Mei Line @ Buaisu, Part 1: advanced indigo dying and reserve techniques course

A 10 day training organised by @leafluberon in Tokushima, Japan, at the @Buaisou-i workshop. An eagerly anticipated trip which went way ahead of my expectations. Filled with people passionate about indigo, natural dying practices, sustainability, life and slow fashion; it was an experience I will treasure for the years to come! You can also find out more about this experience on the Mei Line instagram account @Mei.Line.Design  @Buaisou-i is an indigo dyeing workshop and slow fashion creator but also an indigo farmer: the concept is “From farm to closet”. On top of the indigo dying and reserve techniques, we learned about the traditional Japanese indigo vat making named Aidate. We also visited several local workshops all rooted in local traditions but with a very modern edge that seriously…

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Photoshooting @ la Baye des Anges

La Baye des Anges has been the perfect backdrop for Mei Line’s photoshoot, I even managed to get a group of model’s in for the pool side collection 🙂 Block printed cushions dyed with Campeche extract in summer house And stenciled lavender pouches Indigo Shibori by the fountain Indigo shibori cushions in the living room, perfect match with Alexandre Motte’s paintings Block printed place mats in the patio Oxygenating indigo shiboris under the pergola Arashi shibori in the dining room Cushions showing off in the potager The pool side collection When a piece of linen turns a corner of the deck into a yoga retreat 🙂

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