Posted on

Lee Young-Hee, l’etoffe des rêves

A sublime exhibition at the Musee Guimet in Paris, an endless source of inspiration as all her creations where based on naturally dyed, hand made fabrics, dreamy indeed!

The exhibition opens with traditional Korean costumes, all recreated by the Korean stylist. Most women’s clothing feature the Hanbok, a very short and elegant short top, emblem of Korean traditional costume. 

Even the farmers had extremely elegant clothing..

Lee Young-Her, l'etoffe des rêves

Lee Young-Her, l'etoffe des rêves

In this very hot and humid climate, those bamboo vest and fore arm bands where used against the skin, underneath clothing, to prevent them from sticking to the skin and leaving a layer of air to ventilate the body…

Lee Young-Her, l'etoffe des rêves

Lee Young-Her, l'etoffe des rêves

Lee Young-Her, l'etoffe des rêves

The second part of the exhibition features Lee Young-Hee’s creations. 

Lee Young-Her, l'etoffe des rêves

Lee Young-Her, l'etoffe des rêves

Lee Young-Her, l'etoffe des rêves

Lee Young-Her, l'etoffe des rêves


Lee Young-Her, l'etoffe des rêves

 

 

Posted on

Easter @ la Baye des Anges

A very peculiar Easter this year, in surreal isolation, but plenty of photo opportunities for Mei Line’s catalog with a glorious weather..

This year, we vowed a zero waste easter: we will eat every single egg the bunny will bring us..

Easter at la Baye des Anges

Table cloth and cushion: block printed campeche dyed linen.

Easter at la Baye des Anges

The indigo shibori-covered basket is the perfect recipient for a lovely egg-crop

Easter at la Baye des Anges

Easter at la Baye des Anges

Easter at la Baye des Anges

Easter at la Baye des Anges

Happy Easter y’all! Keep safe!

Posted on Leave a comment

Aizumi-cho historical museum

Another perl in our awesome trip organised by @leafLuberon around the indigo course at Buaisou

Set in the former house of a major indigo merchant, this museum traces the history of indigo production, and use: from seed to fabric. The exquisite miniature scenes are a moving testimony or the hardship  endured by people working in that trade.

Indigo seedlings are protected from pest at night with straw panels

They are pulled out and transplanted in between wheat rows, wheat protects the young seedlings from the strong sun

Wheat is than harvested, leaving only the indigo to thrive

Fertilisation 

The indigo is harvested and the leaves are cut and separated from the stem

The indigo leaves are dried and made into Sukumo, a leaf compost, which is than used to create the indigo dyeing vats. The process is called aidate

The following scenes show the multiple ways pattern are created, with different techniques of reserve making: tied shibori, katazome (stencil) and roketsuzome (batik) 

Untying the knots after the dye

Dying the fabrics in sunken indigo vats

Katazome

Roketsuzome

Katazome

Dyed threads

Shibori patterned length of fabric

A detail from an ancient Yukata and blanket from the museum

 

Posted on Leave a comment

Processing the lavender crop at la Baye des Anges

This year, the crop has been quite late as we where very busy with guests… so by the time we trim the flowers, they are already quite dry and the aromas are quite overpowering!

The field after trimming:

Starting to fill some of the lavender pouches, all hand dyed with natural pigments:

We gently let the lavender dry for months in the shade of the summer house, away from sunlight and in a dry environement…… and we kind of forget about it for weeks… I go back from time to time to shake things up and passing the cut offs from one sheet to another to recover some flowers for my lavender bags as needed.

Needless to say the aromas in the summer house are quite intoxicating, pure Provence, and one of my favourite activities, especially on a mild sunny morning as this 🙂

Lavender processing at la Baye des Anges

Lavender processing at la Baye des Anges

Lavender processing at la Baye des Anges

Lavender processing at la Baye des Anges

Posted on Leave a comment

Sur la route du Tokaido @ Musée Guimet

It seems as I haven’ really come back from Japan… keep looking for indigo everywhere!

On a busy day in paris, I managed to stop at the Musee Guimet to catch an exhibition showcasing a flurry of etchings from the famed Tokaido route. The Tokaido is the east and most famous of the Gokaido routes. It started to develop from the Kamakura (1185-1333) period, but reached a peak during the Edo (1603-1868) period. We have heard about it many times during our Japanese workshops as it widely participated to the flourishing indigo economy on that part of the island.

Sur la route du Tokaido, Musee Guimet

Indigo is indeed very present in the etchings, in the landscapes but also on the clothes which are a fascinating sight if you have the slightest interest in indigo reserve techniques!

The following etchings are all from Utagawa Hiroshige (1797-1858), Edo period.

Sur la route du Tokaido, Musee Guimet

Sur la route du Tokaido, Musee Guimet

Sur la route du Tokaido, Musee Guimet

This portrait series is also from Utagawa Hiroshige (1797-1858), Edo period.

Sur la route du Tokaido, Musee Guimet

Sur la route du Tokaido, Musee Guimet

Sur la route du Tokaido, Musee Guimet

Sur la route du Tokaido, Musee Guimet

Sur la route du Tokaido, Musee Guimet

Sur la route du Tokaido, Musee Guimet

Sur la route du Tokaido, Musee Guimet

Sur la route du Tokaido, Musee Guimet

Sur la route du Tokaido, Musee Guimet

Sur la route du Tokaido, Musee Guimet

Sur la route du Tokaido, Musee Guimet

Sur la route du Tokaido, Musee Guimet

Sur la route du Tokaido, Musee Guimet

Posted on

Buaisou: advanced indigo dying and reserve techniques course

Mei Line @ Buaisu, Part 1: advanced indigo dying and reserve techniques course

A 10 day training organised by @leafluberon in Tokushima, Japan, at the @Buaisou-i workshop. An eagerly anticipated trip which went way ahead of my expectations. Filled with people passionate about indigo, natural dying practices, sustainability, life and slow fashion; it was an experience I will treasure for the years to come!

You can also find out more about this experience on the Mei Line instagram account @Mei.Line.Design 

@Buaisou-i is an indigo dyeing workshop and slow fashion creator but also an indigo farmer: the concept is “From farm to closet”. On top of the indigo dying and reserve techniques, we learned about the traditional Japanese indigo vat making named Aidate. We also visited several local workshops all rooted in local traditions but with a very modern edge that seriously takes on today’s world, all very inspiring! Those will be the subject of subsequent posts, so do watch this space…

The pictures below are mine except when credited below the picture.

Welcome to indigo land…

Mei Line @Buaisu, indigo dying and reserve technique, slow fashion

Indigo master Kakuo Kaji, Buaisou’s Founder

Mei Line @Buaisu, indigo dying and reserve technique, slow fashion

Photocredit: @masao_milkfilm

Our instructors, aka the dream team: Kakuo, Ken, Yuya, Tadashi and Kazuma

Mei Line @Buaisu, indigo dying and reserve technique, slow fashion

The lucky pupils… the usual messy French crowd, that neatly contrasts with the picture above … Messy, but efficient, as the amount of work done over the following 10 days will show 😉

Mei Line @Buaisu, indigo dying and reserve technique, slow fashion

Photo credit: @Buaisou-i

The art of dying in indigo vats:

Mei Line @Buaisu, indigo dying and reserve technique, slow fashion

Mei Line @Buaisu, indigo dying and reserve technique, slow fashion

The art of dying is also the art of rinsing, over and over again:

Mei Line @Buaisu, indigo dying and reserve technique, slow fashion

Mei Line @Buaisu, indigo dying and reserve technique, slow fashion

Mei Line @Buaisu, indigo dying and reserve technique, slow fashion

Mei Line @Buaisu, indigo dying and reserve technique, slow fashion

Katazome, negative pattern with rice paste reserving:

Mei Line @Buaisu, indigo dying and reserve technique, slow fashion

Photo credit: @_buburchacha_

Mei Line @Buaisu, indigo dying and reserve technique, slow fashion

Marianne, @marianne.aubry, one of the @leafluberon trio and instructor at Couleur Garance prepares a stencil with @leafluberon theme:

Mei Line @Buaisu, indigo dying and reserve technique, slow fashion

Photo credit:@Buaisou-i

La Baye des Anges, in katazome

Mei Line @Buaisu, indigo dying and reserve technique, slow fashion

Roketsuzome / Batik: reserve with wax applied in brush strokes:

Mei Line @Buaisu, indigo dying and reserve technique, slow fashion

Photo credit: @Buaisou-i

Mei Line @Buaisu, indigo dying and reserve technique, slow fashion

Photo credit: @Buaisou-i

Mei Line @Buaisu, indigo dying and reserve technique, slow fashion

Photo credit: @Buaisou-i

Mei Line @Buaisu, indigo dying and reserve technique, slow fashion

Creating pattern with screen print and discharge paste:

Mei Line @Buaisu, indigo dying and reserve technique, slow fashion

Karamatsu shibori:

Mei Line @Buaisu, indigo dying and reserve technique, slow fashion

The magic moment when the threads come out after dying and the pattern is revealed:

Mei Line @Buaisu, indigo dying and reserve technique, slow fashion

Photo credit: @Buaisou-i

Mei Line @Buaisu, indigo dying and reserve technique, slow fashion

Itajime shibori:

Mei Line @Buaisu, indigo dying and reserve technique, slow fashion

Mei Line @Buaisu, indigo dying and reserve technique, slow fashion

Mei Line @Buaisu, indigo dying and reserve technique, slow fashion

Mei Line @Buaisu, indigo dying and reserve technique, slow fashion

Mei Line @Buaisu, indigo dying and reserve technique, slow fashion

Mei Line @Buaisu, indigo dying and reserve technique, slow fashion

Colour chart creation:

It seems like a very straight forward thing to do, and it is. But it’s also a very precise and time consuming piece to create, the kind of thing that one never finds the time to do, so it is a real treat to have.

Kakuo patiently explains how it is done, while Harumi, @harumi_textile (one of the @leafluberon trio), patiently translates.

Mei Line @Buaisu, indigo dying and reserve technique, slow fashion

Mei Line @Buaisu, indigo dying and reserve technique, slow fashion

Mei Line @Buaisu, indigo dying and reserve technique, slow fashionMei Line @Buaisu, indigo dying and reserve technique, slow fashion

At the end of the day:

Mei Line @Buaisu, indigo dying and reserve technique, slow fashion

Photo credit: @Buaisou-i

Personal projects:

On the last day, everyone is frantically finishing their lasts personal projects with our newly created indigo vat, which in the words on Kakuo, our instructor, “is strong by virtue of all the passion we all put in its creation” :))))

Marianne, @marianne.aubry, one of the @leafluberon trio and instructor at Couleur Garance dyes one her trademark felt creations:

Mei Line @Buaisu, indigo dying and reserve technique, slow fashion

Photocredit: @masao_milkfilm

Lise, @lise_camoin , also one of the @leafluberon trio and instructor at Couleur Garance:

Mei Line @Buaisu, indigo dying and reserve technique, slow fashion

Photocredit: @masao_milkfilm

Harumi, @harumi_textile (one of the @leafluberon trio), is dying her trademark minutely pleated fabric, a shiborigami technique (see Paul Jackson’s workshop training in Mei Line’s blog)

Mei Line @Buaisu, indigo dying and reserve technique, slow fashion

Photocredit: @harumi_textile

Mei Line @Buaisu, indigo dying and reserve technique, slow fashion

Photocredit: @harumi_textile

Working on my Arashi shibori project

Mei Line @Buaisu, indigo dying and reserve technique, slow fashion

Photocredit: @masao_milkfilm

Calandrage:

On the last day, Kakuo also demonstrates the technique of “calandrage” or waterproofing cotton fabric by repetitive hammering of the fabric:

Mei Line @Buaisu, indigo dying and reserve technique, slow fashion

Mei Line @Buaisu, indigo dying and reserve technique, slow fashion

Mei Line @Buaisu, indigo dying and reserve technique, slow fashion

Photo credit: @Buaisou-i

One last nostalgic look at the @ Buaisou indigo field on the last evening of our course

Mei Line @Buaisu, indigo dying and reserve technique, slow fashion

When the @Buaisou-i  team surprises us with a proper diploma giving ceremony, on the last evening, it is very dificult to hold the tears back..

Mei Line @Buaisu, indigo dying and reserve technique, slow fashion

Photo credit: @Buaisou-i

Thank you Kyoko-san, the brains behind the amazing communication of @Buaisou-i, and the eye being many of the pictures above.

Mei Line @Buaisu, indigo dying and reserve technique, slow fashion

Thank you master Kakuo Kaji-san and the @Buaisou-i  team for sharing all this knowledge, and passion.

Thank you @leafluberon (Harumi-san, @harumi_textile , Lise-san @lise_camoin , Marianne-san, @marianne.aubry), for making this happen.

Thank you Maso Suzuki-san, @masosuzuki   (kneeling in black tshirt) for the translation and the infinite patience!

Thank you Yuki Taniwaki-san, @_buburchacha_, for your photographs and your lovely presence

Thank you Masao Takahashi-san, @masao_milkfilm , we were very honoured to have you for a day

Thank you to all the travelling team for the good vibes ;)… missing you all!

Mei Line @Buaisu, indigo dying and reserve technique, slow fashion

Photo credit: @Buaisou-i

Back home, with many treasures…

Mei Line @Buaisu, indigo dying and reserve technique, slow fashion

Posted on Leave a comment

Photoshooting @ la Baye des Anges

La Baye des Anges has been the perfect backdrop for Mei Line’s photoshoot, I even managed to get a group of model’s in for the pool side collection 🙂

Block printed cushions dyed with Campeche extract in summer house

La Baye des Anges, summer house

And stenciled lavender pouches

La Baye des Anges lavender pouches

Indigo Shibori by the fountain

La Baye des Anges

Indigo shibori cushions in the living room, perfect match with Alexandre Motte‘s paintings

La Baye des Anges

La Baye des Anges, cushions Mei Line

La Baye des Anges, indigo cushions

Block printed place mats in the patio

La Baye des Anges, block print table sets, Mei Line

Oxygenating indigo shiboris under the pergola

La Baye des Anges, pergola

La Baye des Anges, pergola

Arashi shibori in the dining room

La Baye des Anges, dining room

Cushions showing off in the potager

La Baye des Anges, potager

La Baye des Anges, potager

The pool side collection

La Baye des Anges, pool side

When a piece of linen turns a corner of the deck into a yoga retreat 🙂

La Baye des Anges, pool side yoga

Posted on Leave a comment

A workshop with Paul Jackson

Paul Jackson is a rockstar of the design world. Along with his wife he teaches origami techniques and their link to geometry from kindergarten to design students and has written several reference books on folding and pleated techniques.

He presents himself as a paper artist, paper engineer, writer and teacher. We where very lucky to have him come and enlighten us about the technique as well as the math behind them, in a workshop at Couleur Garance, organised by the newly created LEAF Luberon

Paul was so pleased with the association of Shibori and Origami, that he decided to give it a name: Shiborigami

The concepts:

The dying:

Some maths….

Some folding

Paul happy with the works at end of the week-end:

Some of my creations over the week-end

Makes a pretty cool wallpaper for my studio… the Summer lady seems to agree 😉