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Nuishibori

Mei Line nuishibori

Nuishibori is a name used in Japan for all reserve techniques where sticking and tying is involved. It is a fascinating world I am starting to explore, and I find that applying it to our typically French fabrics created a wonderful cultural melting pot. Sticking and tying the fabric. depending on the pattern the stitches are more or less far appart, but it always involves a considerable amount of stitches and knots per square meter of fabric. Indigo dyeing the tied bundles Some finished fabrics… bliss!

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Indigo dyeing

In the world of natural dyes, indigo has a place on it’s own. Unlike other dyes, it does not need mordanting and can be applied to the fabric straight after scouring. However, it is still very labour intensive, and patience is still of essence here. The dye is applied by layers, dipping the fabric repetitively, and oxygenating it between the dips to allow the indigo blue to appear and intensify with every subsequent dip. One of the many things that we learned during our 10 day advanced course at Buaisou, in Japan, is to rinse and fix the indigo. It might sound like a simple thing, but careful manipulation of the fabric during those steps is paramount to the final effect. The rinsing process involved several cold and…

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Itajime shibori

Itajime shibori at Mei Line

Itajime shibori is another reserve technique used to create patterns. This time the fabric is folded and pressed between two pieces of wood. The foods, along with press placement, lead to a variety of patterns. I am always in awe with the magic of those geometric creations when unfolding the fabric, it’s the best time!! The fabric is carefully folded and clamped between two wood presses A number of dips in the indigo vat are necessary to obtain the required depth of colour. between each dip, the fabric is patiently oxygenated by opening up each fold. It is then rinsed and the process is repeated After unfolding…

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Arashi shibori

Arashi shibori at Mei Line

The Arashi pattern is created by tying a piece of cloth very tightly around a cylinder and then crumpling down the fabric to form little creases. It is one of the numerous reserve techniques used in Japan grouped under the shibori term. The tradition was to use a very large bamboo section in Japan, but here, we make do with PVC tube. The fabric is dyed in the indigo vat, several bath separated by oxygenation and rinsing are necessary to achieve the desired tint. After the 3 days long process of rinsing and scouring, the fabric is put to dry. The word Ararshi means lightning, but to me the pattern evokes water, with an infinity of ideas for it’s future use around the house and body..

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Lee Young-Hee, l’etoffe des rêves

A sublime exhibition at the Musee Guimet in Paris, an endless source of inspiration as all her creations where based on naturally dyed, hand made fabrics, dreamy indeed! The exhibition opens with traditional Korean costumes, all recreated by the Korean stylist. Most women’s clothing feature the Hanbok, a very short and elegant short top, emblem of Korean traditional costume.  Even the farmers had extremely elegant clothing.. In this very hot and humid climate, those bamboo vest and fore arm bands where used against the skin, underneath clothing, to prevent them from sticking to the skin and leaving a layer of air to ventilate the body… The second part of the exhibition features Lee Young-Hee’s creations.     

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Easter @ la Baye des Anges

A very peculiar Easter this year, in surreal isolation, but plenty of photo opportunities for Mei Line’s catalog with a glorious weather.. This year, we vowed a zero waste easter: we will eat every single egg the bunny will bring us.. Table cloth and cushion: block printed campeche dyed linen. The indigo shibori-covered basket is the perfect recipient for a lovely egg-crop Happy Easter y’all! Keep safe!

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Aizumi-cho historical museum

Another perl in our awesome trip organised by @leafLuberon around the indigo course at Buaisou Set in the former house of a major indigo merchant, this museum traces the history of indigo production, and use: from seed to fabric. The exquisite miniature scenes are a moving testimony or the hardship  endured by people working in that trade. Indigo seedlings are protected from pest at night with straw panels They are pulled out and transplanted in between wheat rows, wheat protects the young seedlings from the strong sun Wheat is than harvested, leaving only the indigo to thrive Fertilisation  The indigo is harvested and the leaves are cut and separated from the stem The indigo leaves are dried and made into Sukumo, a leaf compost, which is than used…

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Processing the lavender crop at la Baye des Anges

Processing lavender for Mei Line at la Baye des Anges

The lavender field at la Baye des Anges, is the source and inspiration for the lavender pouches production. We planted this field in 2013, and ever since the first crop, we have been enjoying the powerful fragrance all over the house. This year we also planted a couple more rows along the kitchen garden, and in front of the house, along with the potted lavenders of the terrace, they constitute another source of flower goodies, we are not the only ones to enjoy them 😉 Lavender pouches collections over the years… This year has been a particularly late harvest, as I try to leave them in place for guests to enjoy the field. The crop is super concentrated and fills the studio with summer vibes, a real bliss!…

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