Publicado el Deja un comentario

Arimatsu Shibori, from tradition to innovation

Was very lucky to attend a workshop with Kuno Hiroaki organised by Couleur Garance. His enthusiasm about traditional indigo shibori and the way he envisions it’s transposition into a XXIe century sustainable and modern production is very inspiring. We trained in Te-Kumo shibori, and realised the unbelievable amount of work needed to create the patterns by this tying method onto a large (or long) piece of fabric… Kuno brought with him some very ancient textiles, some of them created with forgotten shibori techniques that made then real treasures! Endless inspiration…

+

Publicado el

A workshop with Paul Jackson

Paul Jackson is a rockstar of the design world. Along with his wife he teaches origami techniques and their link to geometry from kindergarten to design students and has written several reference books on folding and pleated techniques. He presents himself as a paper artist, paper engineer, writer and teacher. We where very lucky to have him come and enlighten us about the technique as well as the math behind them, in a workshop at Couleur Garance, organised by the newly created LEAF Luberon Paul was so pleased with the association of Shibori and Origami, that he decided to give it a name: Shiborigami The concepts: The dying: Some maths…. Some folding Paul happy with the works at end of the week-end: Some of my creations over the…

+

Publicado el

Buaisou: advanced indigo dying and reserve techniques course

Mei Line @ Buaisu, Part 1: advanced indigo dying and reserve techniques course

A 10 day training organised by @leafluberon in Tokushima, Japan, at the @Buaisou-i workshop. An eagerly anticipated trip which went way ahead of my expectations. Filled with people passionate about indigo, natural dying practices, sustainability, life and slow fashion; it was an experience I will treasure for the years to come! You can also find out more about this experience on the Mei Line instagram account @Mei.Line.Design @Buaisou-i is an indigo dyeing workshop and slow fashion creator but also an indigo farmer: the concept is «From farm to closet». On top of the indigo dying and reserve techniques, we learned about the traditional Japanese indigo vat making named Aidate. We also visited several local workshops all rooted in local traditions but with a very modern edge that seriously…

+

Publicado el Deja un comentario

Sur la route du Tokaido @ Musée Guimet

It seems as I haven’ really come back from Japan… keep looking for indigo everywhere! On a busy day in paris, I managed to stop at the Musee Guimet to catch an exhibition showcasing a flurry of etchings from the famed Tokaido route. The Tokaido is the east and most famous of the Gokaido routes. It started to develop from the Kamakura (1185-1333) period, but reached a peak during the Edo (1603-1868) period. We have heard about it many times during our Japanese workshops as it widely participated to the flourishing indigo economy on that part of the island. Indigo is indeed very present in the etchings, in the landscapes but also on the clothes which are a fascinating sight if you have the slightest interest in indigo reserve techniques! The…

+

Publicado el Deja un comentario

Sur la route du Tokaido @ Musée Guimet

Sur la route du Tokaido, Musee Guimet

It seems as I haven’ really come back from Japan… keep looking for indigo everywhere! On a busy day in paris, I managed to stop at the Musee Guimet to catch an exhibition showcasing a flurry of etchings from the famed Tokaido route. The Tokaido is the east and most famous of the Gokaido routes. It started to develop from the Kamakura (1185-1333) period, but reached a peak during the Edo (1603-1868) period. We have heard about it many times during our Japanese workshops as it widely participated to the flourishing indigo economy on that part of the island. Indigo is indeed very present in the etchings, in the landscapes but also on the clothes which are a fascinating sight if you have the slightest interest in indigo reserve techniques! The…

+

Publicado el Deja un comentario

Block printing

El block print es una técnica utilizada para crear patrones mediante el estampado de timbres de madera. Los timbres están previamente impregnados ya sea con mordiente concentrado, o con ácido suave que borra el mordiente preexistente en la tela. Esto crea un contraste positivo o negativo una vez expuesto al pigmento. Es un poco complicado porque la impresión sólo se revela mucho más tarde en el proceso, después de que el tinte se ha aplicado. Los timbres de madera que utilizo para la impresión en bloques provienen de una variedad de fuentes y países. De hecho, he sido dueña de muchos de ellos antes de ser iniciada a las alegrías de los tintes naturales: como objetos hablan de una artesanía que me encanta Un amiga ha traído algunos…

+