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Tegumo shibori

Tegumo shibori on grey cedar

Tegumo shibori is a type of tied resist developed in Arimatsu, Japan, where I had the chance of training with master Kuno-san from Kuno Studio (see blogpost in process here) During the Edo period, the busy Tokaido route saw the flourishing of trade. Arimatsu’s specialty was Yukata fabric, and the cotton was predominantly dyed in indigo, with various shibori patterns. Please check the « Sur la route du Tokaido » blogpost for Hiroshige’s etchings of the route, with beautiful illustration of many shibori patterns. A few pictures and a video of the tegumo shibori process of tying a series of cones, which once, untied after dyeing, reveal a rhythmical yet always different pattern. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2onyhyX2pbI

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Upcycling

Indigo shibori up cycled garnements

It all started as a whim, a wish to cover up a stain on an old favourite linen skirt… and it ended up being a great idea! Soon, one of my clients was asking me to upcycle her lovely white linen dress. Upcycling beloved items of clothing to cover up stains, or defects, or just to glamour them up, gives a new life to quality items of clothing made of natural fibres. I have a small stock of organic cotton t-shirts and linen scarves to create some of the shown products, but you are welcome to send me your item to upcycle. A selection previous orders, all pictures are linked to the relevant item

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More shiboris

A fun shooting on the stone stairs of our place in Vaison-la-Romaine, in the heart of the medieval town, where I open the showroom upon appointment. All photos are linked to their respective product or category By the pool at La Baye des Anges where I dye the linen fabric for the pool loungers and the table runners for the pool dining area Also at La Baye des Anges, a set of placemats that turned out to be an instant hit for our epicurean friends While in the garden, the day bed is pilled up high with the latest in antique hemp and linen cushions at the Atelier inauguration

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Back from Tokushima

In Septembre 2019, along with a group of fellow natural dyers conducted by Leaf organisation (now Tinctoria), we had the incredible chance to attend a 10 day class at Buaisou where along with putting together a Sukumo based indigo vat, we also practised several traditional Japanese techniques to create patterns. The result of this, was over the next year, a mountain of cushions and table runners in many different patterns of indigo shibori. All photos are linked to their respective product or category

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Block printing

Le block printing est une technique utilisée pour créer des motifs employant des tampons bois. Les tampons sont auparavant imprégnés soit de mordant concentré, soit d’un acide doux qui efface le mordant préexistant sur le tissu. Cela crée un contraste positif ou négatif une fois exposé au pigment. Cette technique est un peu delicate par le fait que le motif ne se révèle que beaucoup plus tard dans le processus, une fois le colorant appliqué. Les tampons bois que j’utilise pour cette impression proviennent d’une variété de sources et de pays. J’en possédais beaucoup d’entre eux bien avant d’être initiée aux joies de la teinture naturelle, ce genre d’objet m’a toujours attirée. Une amie a rapporté quelques-uns d’entre eux d’un voyage en Inde, certains on ete acheté dans…

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Arimatsu Shibori, de la tradition à l’innovation

Was very lucky to attend a workshop with Kuno Hiroaki organised by Couleur Garance. His enthusiasm about traditional indigo shibori and the way he envisions it’s transposition into a XXIe century sustainable and modern production is very inspiring. We trained in Te-Kumo shibori, and realised the unbelievable amount of work needed to create the patterns by this tying method onto a large (or long) piece of fabric… Kuno brought with him some very ancient textiles, some of them created with forgotten shibori techniques that made then real treasures! Endless inspiration…

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