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Tegumo shibori

Tegumo shibori on grey cedar

Tegumo shibori is a type of tied resist developed in Arimatsu, Japan, where I had the chance of training with master Kuno-san from Kuno Studio (see blogpost in process here) During the Edo period, the busy Tokaido route saw the flourishing of trade. Arimatsu’s specialty was Yukata fabric, and the cotton was predominantly dyed in indigo, with various shibori patterns. Please check the « Sur la route du Tokaido » blogpost for Hiroshige’s etchings of the route, with beautiful illustration of many shibori patterns. A few pictures and a video of the tegumo shibori process of tying a series of cones, which once, untied after dyeing, reveal a rhythmical yet always different pattern. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2onyhyX2pbI

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Upcycling

Indigo shibori up cycled garnements

It all started as a whim, a wish to cover up a stain on an old favourite linen skirt… and it ended up being a great idea! Soon, one of my clients was asking me to upcycle her lovely white linen dress. Upcycling beloved items of clothing to cover up stains, or defects, or just to glamour them up, gives a new life to quality items of clothing made of natural fibres. I have a small stock of organic cotton t-shirts and linen scarves to create some of the shown products, but you are welcome to send me your item to upcycle. A selection previous orders, all pictures are linked to the relevant item

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Shibori-zome, Kuno Hiroaki

Part 3 of a 3 parts training trip to Japan by Tinctoria, November-December 2023 I had the chance of meeting Hiroaki Kuno a few years ago when he came to train us in shibori-zome over a week-end at Couleur Garance. As you those who have been following my work would know, I have since then been extensively practising shibori with natural indigo. With ample occasions to realise how hard it is to get even the « simplest » of these techniques right. Shibori-zome includes an endless variety of reserve technique to produce pattern on fabric when applied before dyeing. Traditional patterns where executed by persons with infinite dexterity and infinite patience. Knot by knot, stitch by stitch, fold by fold, the fabric is crumpled into a much smaller bundle before being…

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More shiboris

A fun shooting on the stone stairs of our place in Vaison-la-Romaine, in the heart of the medieval town, where I open the showroom upon appointment. All photos are linked to their respective product or category By the pool at La Baye des Anges where I dye the linen fabric for the pool loungers and the table runners for the pool dining area Also at La Baye des Anges, a set of placemats that turned out to be an instant hit for our epicurean friends While in the garden, the day bed is pilled up high with the latest in antique hemp and linen cushions at the Atelier inauguration

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Sur la route du Tokaido @ Musée Guimet

Sur la route du Tokaido, Musee Guimet

It seems as I haven’ really come back from Japan… keep looking for indigo everywhere! On a busy day in paris, I managed to stop at the Musee Guimet to catch an exhibition showcasing a flurry of etchings from the famed Tokaido route. The Tokaido is the east and most famous of the Gokaido routes. It started to develop from the Kamakura (1185-1333) period, but reached a peak during the Edo (1603-1868) period. We have heard about it many times during our Japanese workshops as it widely participated to the flourishing indigo economy on that part of the island. Indigo is indeed very present in the etchings, in the landscapes but also on the clothes which are a fascinating sight if you have the slightest interest in indigo reserve techniques! The…

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Itajime shibori

Itajime shibori à Mei Line

Itajime shibori est une autre technique de réserve utilisée pour créer des motifs. Cette fois, le tissu est plié et pressé entre deux morceaux de bois. Les plis, ainsi que le placement de la presse, permettent de créer une variété infinie de motifs. Je suis toujours en admiration devant la magie de ces motifs geometriques lors du dépliage du tissu, c’est le meilleur moment!! Le tissu est soigneusement plié et serré entre deux presses en bois Un certain nombre de trempages dans la cuve indigo sont nécessaires pour obtenir la couleur requise. Entre chaque trempage, le tissu est patiemment oxygéné en ouvrant chaque pli. Il est ensuite rincé et le processus est répété Après le dépliage… Bonheur! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wQ-J9QKuRCI

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Arashi shibori

Arashi shibori at Mei Line

The Arashi pattern is created by tying a piece of cloth very tightly around a cylinder and then crumpling down the fabric to form little creases. It is one of the numerous reserve techniques used in Japan grouped under the shibori term. The tradition was to use a very large bamboo section in Japan, but here, we make do with PVC tube. The fabric is dyed in the indigo vat, several bath separated by oxygenation and rinsing are necessary to achieve the desired tint. After the 3 days long process of rinsing and scouring, the fabric is put to dry. The word Arashi means lightning, but to me the pattern evokes water, with an infinity of ideas for it’s future use around the house and body.. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pzlLxugcTQ0

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Back from Tokushima

In Septembre 2019, along with a group of fellow natural dyers conducted by Leaf organisation (now Tinctoria), we had the incredible chance to attend a 10 day class at Buaisou where along with putting together a Sukumo based indigo vat, we also practised several traditional Japanese techniques to create patterns. The result of this, was over the next year, a mountain of cushions and table runners in many different patterns of indigo shibori. All photos are linked to their respective product or category

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Musée historique d’Aizumi-cho

Un autre perle de notre voyage organisé par @leafLuberon autour du parcours indigo à Buaisou Situé dans l’ancienne maison d’un grand marchand d’indigo, ce musée retrace l’histoire de la production d’indigo, et son utilisation: de la graine au tissu. Les scènes miniatures exquises sont un témoignage émouvant du travail des gens qui travaillent dans ce secteur. Les semis indigo sont protégés contre les parasites la nuit avec des panneaux de paille Ils sont retirés et transplantés entre les rangées de blé, le blé protège les jeunes semis du soleil fort Le blé est récolté, laissant l’indigo prospérer Fertilisation L’indigo est récolté et les feuilles sont coupées et séparées de la tige Les feuilles indigo sont séchées et transformées en Sukumo, un compost de feuilles, qui est utilisé pour…

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